UK Lawyer Loses Case on Forced Retirement

The Independent is reporting on a landmark UK Supreme Court ruling that has dismissed the appeal of Leslie Seldon, a partner who challenged London law firm Clarkson Wright & Jakes’ policy of mandatory retirement at age 65.

While the court denied Seldon’s appeal, it remitted his case back to the Employment Tribunal “to consider whether the choice of mandatory age of 65 was a proportionate means of achieving the legitimate aims of the partnership.”

The Independent quoted Clive Howard, a partner in the employment team at law firm Russell Jones & Walker, who provided his opinion on the ruling:

“The Supreme Court decision in Seldon is disappointing given the recent abolition of the forced retirement of employees, since it upheld that a partner at a law firm could, in principle, be forced to retire at a given age.

“This would appear to undermine the Government’s decision to abolish retirement ages in the first place.

“However, employers should not form the view that this means it will be lawful to force staff to retire at 65 up and down the country.

“There were specific factors which applied to this small law firm in Kent, which will not be relevant to every organisation.

“The Supreme Court has asked the Employment Tribunal to consider whether the retirement age of 65 was justified on the facts of this case.”

Read the full story right here.

– David Dias

2 comments on “UK Lawyer Loses Case on Forced Retirement

  1. lawyercriminal06
    July 3, 2013 at 3:23 am #

    “The Supreme Court decision in Seldon is disappointing given the recent abolition of the forced retirement of employees”- well it would actually be a right step to abolish forced retirements of employees lawyers. With experience and knowledge they can give new insights to even the most complex cases.

  2. scrabble cheat
    April 27, 2012 at 8:05 am #

    “This would appear to undermine the Government’s decision to abolish retirement ages in the first place” – perhaps that won’t be so bad if to abolish retirement ages. It could lead to something new and even maybe something successful?

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